How to Discipline Bad Behaviors of Your Teen

Parent's Guide

Lucky catch! You stumbled upon this article to help you in putting reigns to your teens after developing bad behaviors. Learning bad behaviors is normal for a developing teenager. But, it does not mean that you have to tolerate these bad behaviors. As their parent, you still have to make sure that your once angelic baby will grow up into a responsible adult. To help you stay sane in managing your troubled teen, here are some easy tricks that you can use:

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How Not To Miss Your Curfew After Your First Date

Good Reads For Youths

Being a teenager opens a new array of things that you can now do without the supervision of your parents 24/7. This array includes going out on friendly dates. Some of you might still be too young to go on friendly dates and that’s okay. Don’t rebel against your parents for that reason because they are just protecting you.

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5 Ways To Avoid Peer Pressure And Beat Your Curfew

Good Reads For Youths

For teenagers, having a curfew means saying “no” to a couple of drinks and to an evening stroll in the city with their peers. Most teens cringe at the thought of going home earlier than their friends and missing out on the fun. Being at the point in their lives where they crave for adrenaline rush and live by the carpe diem or “seize the moment” attitude, missing out makes them feel left out, sad, and envious of their friends’ adventures—which could turn into anger at their parents for setting a curfew in the first place.

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How to Make Teens Still Enjoy Time at Home

Parent's Guide

Teenagers can become distant to their family as soon as they found out how to have fun with their friends. They start to be more independent as soon as they become affiliated with people having the same interests and mindsets as they have. This might be worrisome for parents who want their teens to spend time with the family immediately after school.

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Best Ways to Focus on Studies

Good Reads For Youths

When you enter a high school or a university, having new friends sometimes distracts you from your main objective in entering the institution: to study and to learn. This can be particularly true when you have a new set of friends who are always on the go to bond and meet wherever and whenever.

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Why It’s Okay To Say “No” To Your Friends

Good Reads For Youths

So your friends are inviting you to try this newly-opened coffee shop downtown and hang out for a while because it’s a weekend. You are deciding whether you should come so you can unwind. You really want to go but with the piles of homework and upcoming exams that you have next week, is it okay to say “no”?

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How Do I motivate My Teen To Study Better?

Parent's Guide

Education is undeniably indispensable. Its positive effect on human life and its rudimentary role in our society are essential for a human being’s growth and development. In fact, with the advent of technology in today’s world, everything we create is based on knowledge obtained through education. As the world progresses, the need for educated people is rapidly increasing, so is the competition.

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How Parents Can Prevent Mishaps Before Curfew

Parent's Guide

Parents might impose curfew to their children in order to keep them safe from harm on the road at night. However, having a curfew is not a one-stop-shop solution for all the problems of safety and welfare for your children. They will still have the freedom to go about their own trips and adventures during daytime. They might also be exposed to the similar dangers that curfews are preventing them to be exposed to.

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How To Prevent Your Teen’s Cell Phone Addiction

Parent's Guide

It’s a familiar scene: You are trying to initiate a family bonding over dinner and your teen’s eyes are glued to his/her smartphone. With all its glowing light, tapping on its screen, and smiling, your teen and the phone are appears to be having a conversation. You call his/her attention and he/she replies (as always) with, “What?”

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